Critical Tourism Studies conference 2013

This looks set to be a really interesting event.  As tourism has matured as an academic area, there has been increasing activity in this field, with academics and organisations producing and responding to an emerging ‘critical turn’ in tourism studies.  This turn, which other disciplines such as (for example) history, literature and geography encountered at various stages in their own development, opens up new possibilities for tourism studies to engage with ‘bigger’ issues such as social justice, environmental politics and gender.  This new ‘Critical Tourism Studies’ movement is inter-disciplinary and is moving beyond the narrow disciplinary focus of much tourism studies as a subject with business or management schools.

The next Critical Tourism Studies conference is being held in Sarajevo, the capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, on 25-28th June 2013.  I’ve copied the call for paper below:

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL TOURISM STUDIES CONFERENCE V
JUNE 25th – 28th 2013

SARAJEVO, BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA

 Tourism Critical Practice: Activating Dreams into Action

 

Join us in Sarajevo for the 5th Critical Tourism Studies Conference. This is a conference with a difference, with a great line-up of keynote speakers and a strong CSR vision.  For more information, take a look at our website:

http://somwp.som.surrey.ac.uk/cts/

Keynote speakers:

MICHAEL HALL  (University of Canterbury)

TOM SELWYN  (SOAS, University of London)

FREYA HIGGINS-DESBIOLLES & KYLE POWYS WHITE (University of Southern Australia & Michigan State University)

 We welcome papers and offers to lead interactive workshops on the following themes:

Critical action in the classroom

  • Critical pedagogies in tourism, hospitality and events education
  • Envisioning the future of tourism, hospitality and events education
  • Fostering critical and socially active attitudes in students

Tourism and its potential as a social force

  • Social justice, exclusion and social inequality
  • ‘Worldmaking’ and the transformation of places and cultures
  • Empowerment, developing sustainable communities and creative / social entrepreneurship
  • Postcolonial readings of tourism
  • Tourism and its relation to gender, class, race, sexuality, ethnicity and disability

Critical tourism research practices

  • Innovative and critical research methods
  • Positionality and the emotional dynamics of research
  • Academic freedom

Critical scholarship in action

  • The relationship between academia and activism
  • Impacts of and empowerment through critical research
  • Public evaluation and dissemination of critical research

All abstracts should be written in English and must not exceed 300 words in length. Abstracts should be sent to cts@surrey.ac.uk and must include: author(s), affiliation(s), a summary of the research aims, approach and key arguments/findings.

Key dates

Abstracts: 31st January 2013. Authors will be notified of acceptance before 15th February 2013.

Full papers (5000 words) and working papers (2000 words) for online, refereed, free-access conference proceedings: April 1st 2013. Full and working papers should be submitted electronically to cts@surrey.ac.uk. Style for papers: Arial 11, double spaced, reference in Harvard style.

Contact the conference conveners:

Dr Lynn Minnaert – l.minnaert@surrey.ac.uk
Dr Senija Causevic – senija.causevic@soas.ac.uk

Dr Irena Ateljevic – irena.ateljevic@iztzg.hr
Professor Nigel Morgan – nmorgan@cardiffmet.ac.uk
Professor Annette Pritchard – apritchard@cardiffmet.ac.uk

Packaging liminality: the management and commodification of liminal landscapes in tourism

Wesley Rykalski and I have had the abstract below accepted for the ATLAS 2011 conference in Valmeira, Latvia.  The theme of the conference is ’Landscape and Tourism: a dualistic relationship”.  Our plan for this paper is to take the methodology that we’ve been developing through the ‘Reading the Arcades / Reading the Promenades’ project over the last two years and apply it to other tourist spaces, in order to test its value as a new approach to engaging with the non-spaces (Auge 1995) of much touristic practice.

Seaside towns and Local Enterprise Partnerships

This is a copy of a presentation that myself and a colleague, Samantha Chaperon, were due to give at the ATHE 2010 conference last week. Sadly the weather conspired against us, but the organisers have been kind enough to let us submit the full paper for the proceedings, which I will post a link to here in Spring 2011 once they have been published.

Arts-led regeneration – visit of Japanese scholars to Kent

I was very pleased to be invited last week to speak to a group of Japanese scholars from Oita University who were on a visit to Kent to investigate cultural regeneration led by Teresa Smith from the University of Oxford. 

JK discussing cultura regeneration with visiting academics 

I spoke about my research into the social impacts of cultural regeneration and we had a detailed discussion of the recent evolution of British regeneration policy from the Single Regeneration Budget era to the new Local Enterprise Partnerships.  You can see my presentation below.

*

*I’d love to be able to credit the artists involved in the first picture on my slides.  It was emailed to me in 2007 by a participant in some research I was doing at the time and I think it’s a fantastic image.  If you have any info on this, please let me know!

The development of seaside towns: domestic tourism in a core-periphery context

I’ve been working on some new research with a colleague, Samantha Chaperon, which uses dependency theory as a framework for analysing the development of seaside towns. In particular, we’re interested in what light this research can shed on the new Local Enterprise Partnerships that affect these towns. We’ll be presenting the early stages of our research at the ATHE conference from 1-3 December in Canterbury, UK, and I’ve included the abstract for the paper below:

Peripherality in tourism has traditionally been a concept used to contrast remote, economically disadvantaged, often exotic locations, with the prosperous tourism generating core(s) of northern, western nations. Dependency theory highlights the tension that this creates between nations and populations whose relationships are constructed on the basis of inequality (Britton 1982). This ‘core-periphery conflict’ has produced global landscapes of tourism governance that reflect these inequalities (Jordan 2004).

There have been relatively few attempts to study the governance of domestic tourism within the context of core-periphery theory (CPT). This is a significant omission in tourism and governance literature as domestic tourism at the local level also manifests economic and social inequalities which can lead to conflict (Weaver 1998, Bianchi 2002).

This paper examines the historical and contemporary development of British seaside towns, and the governance of tourism in these towns from a CPT perspective, concentrating on three historical periods. Firstly, the mid 19th century in which their development was tied to the growth of British industrial centres. Secondly, the period in the second half of the 20th century when the growth of southern Mediterranean resorts presented a challenge to seaside towns and, finally, the first two decades of the 21st century in which attempts to regenerate seaside tourism in the UK have been governed by the spatial remits of Regional Development Agencies and the new Local Enterprise Partnerships (Kennell 2010).

Simulated Cities

I’ve recently had this monograph, based on my Master’s research, published as a book called ‘Simulated Cities: cultural regeneration, branding and representation in urban development’.  Click on the image below to find out more information…

Liminal Landscapes

Wesley Rykalski and I will be presenting a paper based on our research for the arcades / promenades project at  this conference.   Once the paper is finished we’ll post more details up on our project blog, along with a programme for the event, once it is available.

You can read the abstract for our paper by clicking here.  The final paper is quite a development from this point and incorporates some of the material that we have been posting on here over the last year.

New posts on Aracdes / Promenades

There are three new posts up on our ‘Reading the Arcades / Reading the Promenades’ blog. The first is on our use of a yahoo pipe to collect images of the seaside promenade, the second is a set of links to other projects who also use Benjamin’s ‘Aracdes Project’ as inspiration for new work, and the latest post is a series of quotations on the use of photography in sociology.

New post on Arcades / Promenades

Wesley has posted up the latest contribution to our ‘Reading the Arcades, reading the Promenades’ blog, where we are attempting to bring together our readings of Walter Benjamins’ ‘Arcades Project‘ and apply these to the British seaside promenade.

The Arcades Project
The Arcades Project

A taster of Wesley’s piece:

“Benjamin is, very, clear and, far too, concise in his summation of the method of The Arcades Project.  Convolute N, which deals with his historical method and his analysis of that method (moving into the philosophy of method and history), contains a very great deal of material but the following are his key methodological statements on the Project itself.

This work has to develop to the highest degree the art of citing without quotation marks. Its theory is intimately related to that of montage.
[N1,10]

Method of this project: literary montage. I needn’t say anything. Merely show. I shall purloin no valuables, appropriate no ingenious formulations. But the rags, the refuse – these I will not inventory but allow, in the only way possible, to come into their own: by making use of them.
[N1a,8] “

CFP: Liminal landscapes – remapping the field

This looks to be an excellent event. Wesley Rykalski and I will probably be submitting a paper, based on some of our work on our arcades / promenades project.

Symposium
Liverpool John Moores University
1st July 2010
 
Convenors
Dr Hazel Andrews, (Tourism, Consumer and Food Studies, LJMU)
Dr Kevin Meethan, Department of Sociology, University of Plymouth
Dr Les Roberts (School of Architecture, University of Liverpool)
 
Ideas and concepts of liminality have long shaped debates around the uses and practices of space in tourism. Victor Turner’s writings on ritual and communitas, Graburn’s theory of tourism as a sacred journey, or Shield’s discussion of ‘places on the margin’ have secured a well-established foothold in the theoretical landscapes of travel and mobility. The unique qualities of liminal landscapes, as developed by these and other writers on the subject, are generally held to be those which play host to ideas of the ludic, consumption, carnivalesque, inversion or suspension of normative social and moral structures of everyday life, deterritorialisation and ‘becoming’, and so on. While these arguments and tropes remain pertinent, and their metaphorical appeal evermore attractive, the extent to which these spaces provoke counter ideas of social control, terror, surveillance, production and territorialisation, invites an urgent call to re-evaluate the meanings attached to ideas of the ‘liminal’ in tourism studies. The deaths of 21 Chinese migrant workers in Morecambe Bay in 2004 has prompted a sobering re-assessment of the coastal resort as a site of tourism, leisure and consumption. The shifting social geographies associated with these landscapes has meant that the example of the beach may equally be looked upon as a space of transnational labour, migrancy, racial tension, death, fear, uncertainty and disorientation. In this instance, the precarious and un-navigable natural landscape of Morecambe sands becomes a metonym for the increasingly de-stabilising landscapes of trans- or post-national capitalist mobility. Moreover, the settlement of asylum seekers and refugees in UK coastal resorts such as Margate has exposed the underlying tensions and social divisions between representations that play on the ludic, touristic heritage of these resorts and those which address the marginality and exclusion that characterises the other set of mobilities and meanings evoked by these spaces. In addition, the appropriation of liminal landscapes by, for example, local authorities, commercial bodies and marketeers constructs an increasingly mediated or textualised space of performance that re-fashions the embodied (and embedded) spaces as lived by those who make up their diverse social fabric.
 
We invite contributions from across a broad interdisciplinary field, including scholars and practitioners working in tourism and mobility studies, anthropology, geography, film and cultural studies. We also invite multimedia submissions on the topic of liminal landscapes.
 
For enquiries and further details contact Dr Hazel Andrews H.J.Andrews@ljmu.ac.uk.
 
Please submit proposals for papers (300 words maximum) by e-mail to H.J.Andrews@ljmu.ac.uk. We also welcome proposals for panels and exhibits.
 
Deadline for proposals:                                                 30 September 2009
Notification of acceptance:                                            November 2009
Date for Registration:                                                    March 2010
Final submission deadline for full papers:                       7 January 2010
                                                  
Papers selected from the conference proceedings will be published in Journal of Tourism Consumption and Practice (www.tourismconsumption.org.).

Faculty of
Education, Community and Leisure

 
Dr Hazel Andrews PhD, MA, BSc
Senior Lecturer Tourism, Culture and Society
Centre for Tourism, Consumer and Food Studies
 

IM Marsh, Barkhill Road, Aigburth, Liverpool, L17 6BD
t: 0151 231 5234  e: H.J.Andrews@ljmu.ac.uk 
w: www.ljmu.ac.uk
Symposium
Liverpool John Moores University
1st July 2010
 
Convenors
Dr Hazel Andrews, (Tourism, Consumer and Food Studies, LJMU)
Dr Kevin Meethan, Department of Sociology, University of Plymouth
Dr Les Roberts (School of Architecture, University of Liverpool)
 
Ideas and concepts of liminality have long shaped debates around the uses and practices of space in tourism. Victor Turner’s writings on ritual and communitas, Graburn’s theory of tourism as a sacred journey, or Shield’s discussion of ‘places on the margin’ have secured a well-established foothold in the theoretical landscapes of travel and mobility. The unique qualities of liminal landscapes, as developed by these and other writers on the subject, are generally held to be those which play host to ideas of the ludic, consumption, carnivalesque, inversion or suspension of normative social and moral structures of everyday life, deterritorialisation and ‘becoming’, and so on. While these arguments and tropes remain pertinent, and their metaphorical appeal evermore attractive, the extent to which these spaces provoke counter ideas of social control, terror, surveillance, production and territorialisation, invites an urgent call to re-evaluate the meanings attached to ideas of the ‘liminal’ in tourism studies. The deaths of 21 Chinese migrant workers in Morecambe Bay in 2004 has prompted a sobering re-assessment of the coastal resort as a site of tourism, leisure and consumption. The shifting social geographies associated with these landscapes has meant that the example of the beach may equally be looked upon as a space of transnational labour, migrancy, racial tension, death, fear, uncertainty and disorientation. In this instance, the precarious and un-navigable natural landscape of Morecambe sands becomes a metonym for the increasingly de-stabilising landscapes of trans- or post-national capitalist mobility. Moreover, the settlement of asylum seekers and refugees in UK coastal resorts such as Margate has exposed the underlying tensions and social divisions between representations that play on the ludic, touristic heritage of these resorts and those which address the marginality and exclusion that characterises the other set of mobilities and meanings evoked by these spaces. In addition, the appropriation of liminal landscapes by, for example, local authorities, commercial bodies and marketeers constructs an increasingly mediated or textualised space of performance that re-fashions the embodied (and embedded) spaces as lived by those who make up their diverse social fabric.
 
We invite contributions from across a broad interdisciplinary field, including scholars and practitioners working in tourism and mobility studies, anthropology, geography, film and cultural studies. We also invite multimedia submissions on the topic of liminal landscapes.
 
For enquiries and further details contact Dr Hazel Andrews H.J.Andrews@ljmu.ac.uk.
 
Please submit proposals for papers (300 words maximum) by e-mail to H.J.Andrews@ljmu.ac.uk. We also welcome proposals for panels and exhibits.
 
Deadline for proposals:                                                 30 September 2009
Notification of acceptance:                                            November 2009
Date for Registration:                                                    March 2010
Final submission deadline for full papers:                       7 January 2010
                                                  
Papers selected from the conference proceedings will be published in Journal of Tourism Consumption and Practice (www.tourismconsumption.org.).

Faculty of
Education, Community and Leisure

 
Dr Hazel Andrews PhD, MA, BSc
Senior Lecturer Tourism, Culture and Society
Centre for Tourism, Consumer and Food Studies
 

IM Marsh, Barkhill Road, Aigburth, Liverpool, L17 6BD
t: 0151 231 5234  e: H.J.Andrews@ljmu.ac.uk 
w: www.ljmu.ac.uk