CHME 2019 – Transforming Hospitality

 

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CHME 2019 – Transforming Hospitality

21 May – 24 May 2019

University of Greenwich, London

Register now at www.gre.ac.uk/CHME19

The University of Greenwich are delighted to be hosting the 28th annual conference of the Council for Hospitality Management and Education – ‘Transforming Hospitality’ which has a focus on how hospitality enables us to understand the complex social and cultural structures and practices within which it operates. New multidisciplinary enquiries are redefining what hospitality is with a view to contributing to what hospitality is becoming – a tool that allows us to critically appraise the changes that are taking place in the world around us.

This conference aims to showcase insightful and influential research and help to set future research agendas within critical hospitality studies, hospitality management, health, and urban hospitality. To share the best practice in scholarship and pedagogy, this conference will also provide opportunities for those academics and industry professionals wishing to contribute to enhancing the value of pedagogic research.

Full details of the conference, including the call for papers, can be found at: www.gre.ac.uk/CHME19

Conference Tracks
Track 1: Hospitality Management
Track 2: Critical and Cultural Studies of Hospitality
Track 3: Learning, Teaching and Assessment in Hospitality Management Education
Track 4: Urban Hospitality
Track 5: Hospitality and Wellness

Attendance Fees:
Early Bird Fee: £440 Non-members, £340 Members, £210 Student

Full Conference Fee: £480 Non-members, £380 Members, £250 Student

One Day Fee: £200

Gala Dinner for your guests: £110

 

Register now at www.gre.ac.uk/CHME19

UK Tourism Policy – A Punctuated Equilibrium view

Based on our ongoing research into tourism policy in the UK, Dr Samantha Chaperon and I recently gave this presentation at the International Conference on Tourism in Naples, Italy.

In our presentation, we present research where we tested the utility of the concept of punctuated equilibrium, for understanding recent changes in UK tourism policy.  Punctuated Equilibrium draws our attention to two different groups of people and organisations in understanding change and continuity in tourism policy.  Firstly, the policy community involved in framing, creating and implementing tourism policies in the UK.  Secondly, the role of issue networks in attempting to shift the tourism policy agenda – broadly speaking, this would be activity by non-governmental interest groups, such as lobbying and campaigning.

In our presentation, we presented two brief case studies.  Firstly, we explained how the conservative elements of the UK’s coalition government, which was elected in 2010, slowly worked to change the composition of the tourism policy community until they were able to achieve their ideological goal of significantly reducing public sector support for tourism, despite this having no real support from the broader tourism sector in the country.

Secondly, we discussed how a campaign with very broad support from industry, and from many politicians and organisations outside of this policy community had failed to achieve their aims of achieving a reduction in sales tax (VAT) on the tourism and hospitality sector.

We concluded that the perspective of punctuated equilibrium was helpful in explaining why a long period of stability in tourism policy and been broken by a series of quite dramatic changes in tourism governance in the UK.  Punctuated Equilibrium suggests that we should be able to explain the evolution of tourism policy through analysing the tension between policy communities and issues networks – our initial investigations have led us to conclude that, in the case of the UK, the policy community is the dominant part of this equation.  We plan to develop this further for a paper next year….

 

 

My contribution to Serbian TV

I recently spoke at the MEKST 2015 conference in Novi Sad, Serbia.  You can read my post about this here.  During the event I was interviewed by Dusan Kristic from Radio Televizija Vojvodine for a programme that they made about the conference and you can view the programme below.  It is 25 minutes long and also features contributions from Angela Benson  and Alan Godsave, who were also speaking at MEKST.

In the video, I suggest ways in which tourism in Serbia could be developed to attract more international tourists and the role of festivals and events in tourism development.

Dark Cities?

This is a presentation based on research that my colleague Raymond Powell and I have been carrying out into Dark Tourism in Europe.  Raymond gave the presentation at the 2nd Annual Conference of the Association of Cultural and Digital Tourism in Athens, Greece.  Dark tourism can be defined as tourism associated with the visitation of sites which have death, tragedy or suffering as their main theme. Commonly such visits are conducted with commemoration, education or entertainment in mind (Stone, 2005). Europe has an abundance of such sites, both real and imagined, which offer ample opportunities to experience dark tourism in all of these ways if so desired. However, they are rarely conceptualised as dark products, and as such categorisation of individual attractions is, at the moment, confused. In the paper that we presented, we begin the process of ranking European cities in terms of how ‘dark’ their tourism offer is.  We hope to develop this over the next couple of years, firstly by carrying out some case studies to verify this initial ranking process.  You can read the abstract of our paper below.

 

Despite the recent growth of research into dark tourism (Dale & Robinson, 2011; Lennon & Foley, 2000; Stone, 2013; Tarlow, 2005) and the growth of the dark tourism market (Biran & Hyde, 2013; Stone 2005; Stone & Sharpley, 2008), there has been little interest shown in understanding the relationship between dark tourism and urban tourism (Page & Hall 2002). This paper presents the initial findings of a research project that investigates the dark tourism products offered by European cities. A series of keywords were developed following a review of the dark tourism literature and this was used carry out a content analysis of the Destination Marketing Organisation websites for Europe’s ten most visited cities.  The content analysis used Stone’s (2006) Dark Tourism Continuum to evaluate the dark tourism products offered in each destination and to present a descriptive overview of Europe’s city-based dark tourism offer.   The paper concludes that there are a wide range of dark tourism products available to urban tourists in Europe, but that these are rarely conceptualised as such.  The mixture of ‘light’ and ‘dark’ dark tourism products presents difficulties in categorisation and standardisation of the urban tourism offer, but this is a potential area of new product development for DMOs across Europe.

Turizmijada 2015

Last week, I gave a presentation at the Turizmijada 2015 event in Tivat, Montenegro. This was the 8th annual event hosted by the International Association of Students of Tourism and Hospitality.  You can see my presentation, on ‘Sustainable Tourism Development in the Adriatic Region’, at the end of this post, or by clicking here.

Tivat, Montenegro
Tivat, Montenegro

The event was held in the beautiful Bay of Kotor, on the Adriatic coast and brought together hundreds of students and faculty members from a range of countries.  It was a very international event – most of the delegates came from Balkan countries such as Montenegro, Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia, but there were representatives from much further afield, including the UK and Japan.  One of the supporters of the event was Porto Montenegro, a huge new luxury super yacht marina development which is making a massive contribution to tourism development in Tivat, and in Montenegro more widely.

Bay of Kotor, Tivat, Montenegro
Bay of Kotor, Tivat, Montenegro

Turizmijada has three strands to it – the academic conference, a sporting competition for universities in the region and entertainment for the delegates.  The academic conference was excellent, with presentations from academics from Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro and the UK.  The second day of presentations was hosted by the always excellent Dr Rob Davidson, a former colleague from the the University of Greenwich and now the director of MICE Knowledge.

Peter Gulobovic, the organiser and host of Turizmijada
Peter Gulobovic, the organiser and host of Turizmijada

This was my first time at Turizmijada, and my first time in Montenegro. I’m sure I’ll be going back in the near future.  The event is well organised and full of energetic and engaged tourism students, who are really focused on how to develop tourism in the region.  The opportunity to meet colleagues countries that have fast growing tourism industries is excellent and I’ll be looking to include many of the projects that I’ve encountered as case studies in my teaching at the University of Greenwich next year.

Implementing the Witty Review: Universities and Economic Development

I”ve been invited to chair this Inside Government event on 21st January 2014.  ‘Implementing the Witty Review: One Year On’, looks like a very interesting event and, as always with Inside Government events, there is a great range of speakers lined up.

Andrew-Witty-300x138
Click this image to read Sir Andrew Witty’s report

I’ve been to a couple of Inside Government events and I spoke at one back in 2012, when I gave this presentation on tourism and local economic development. They tend to keep their events quite small, for around 50 delegates, and this means that there is lots of scope for meeting people and getting involved in discussions.  In my work with the Economic Development Resource Centre at the University of Greenwich, I’ve been involved for a few years in linking academics to public and private sector organisations seeking to promote economic development and I’m very much looking forward to learning from the other participants in this event in January.

 

Advances in Tourism Economics 2014 – Event motivations and attendee spending

Last week, I presented a paper on event motivations at the 5th Biennial Advances in Tourism Economics conference in Lisbon, Portugal.

The Universidade Lusíada de Lisboa campus
The Universidade Lusíada de Lisboa campus

The paper was written by four of us and my co-authors were Denise Hawkes, Emma Abson and Paul Booth.  It was an analysis of the relationship between motivations to attend events that were part of a festival, and attendee expenditure.  We carried out quite an extensive review of the literature, and found that this relationship had not really been explored before; most published research looks at the relationship between motivations and attendee satisfaction, or how to target marketing towards motivational segments.  This is the presentation that I gave at the event:

The abstract for the paper is below, if you’d like to read more, then get in touch.  We’re hoping that the paper will be published in one of the post-conference publications.

This paper explores the impact of motivation factors on spending at a local authority’s programme of cultural events.  This paper takes a closer look at the motivational and demographic data collected as part of the study and, using regression analysis, it identifies large variations in spending by different motivational groups of attendees. Attendees motivated to attend to ‘meet new people’ were found to be the highest spending group by some margin. In addition, the data shows that local audiences are the lowest spenders at these events and that there is no link between previous attendance and event expenditure.   We identify a significant relationship between event attendee motivation and event expenditure, which suggests ways in which these public sector events can be developed and marketed in the future, as local authorities balance the competing priorities of local inclusion and generating local economic impact, through their event programming.

An analysis of the UK Government’s tourism policy

We’ve just had this analysis published in the journal ‘Cultural Trends’. You can download the article from here.  If you don’t have access, please contact me.  The abstract is below, as well as a presentation of the article that we gave at the Tourism Trends and Advances in the 21st Century conference in Rhodes, earlier this year.

“This review considers the UK Government’s 2011 tourism policy document. The policy was produced during a period of public sector restructuring in the UK and also during the global economic crisis, which began in 2008. The policy sets out a number of reforms to the governance of tourism at the national and local levels, which aim to increase the level of private sector involvement in leading and developing the tourism sector and to reduce the sector’s dependence on public funding. During a period of economic slowdown in the UK, the tourism industry can make a significant contribution to growth, but it is not yet clear whether these proposed reforms will support or impede the future development of the tourism industry in the UK.”

Critical Tourism Studies conference 2013

This looks set to be a really interesting event.  As tourism has matured as an academic area, there has been increasing activity in this field, with academics and organisations producing and responding to an emerging ‘critical turn’ in tourism studies.  This turn, which other disciplines such as (for example) history, literature and geography encountered at various stages in their own development, opens up new possibilities for tourism studies to engage with ‘bigger’ issues such as social justice, environmental politics and gender.  This new ‘Critical Tourism Studies’ movement is inter-disciplinary and is moving beyond the narrow disciplinary focus of much tourism studies as a subject with business or management schools.

The next Critical Tourism Studies conference is being held in Sarajevo, the capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, on 25-28th June 2013.  I’ve copied the call for paper below:

CALL FOR PAPERS

INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL TOURISM STUDIES CONFERENCE V
JUNE 25th – 28th 2013

SARAJEVO, BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA

 Tourism Critical Practice: Activating Dreams into Action

 

Join us in Sarajevo for the 5th Critical Tourism Studies Conference. This is a conference with a difference, with a great line-up of keynote speakers and a strong CSR vision.  For more information, take a look at our website:

http://somwp.som.surrey.ac.uk/cts/

Keynote speakers:

MICHAEL HALL  (University of Canterbury)

TOM SELWYN  (SOAS, University of London)

FREYA HIGGINS-DESBIOLLES & KYLE POWYS WHITE (University of Southern Australia & Michigan State University)

 We welcome papers and offers to lead interactive workshops on the following themes:

Critical action in the classroom

  • Critical pedagogies in tourism, hospitality and events education
  • Envisioning the future of tourism, hospitality and events education
  • Fostering critical and socially active attitudes in students

Tourism and its potential as a social force

  • Social justice, exclusion and social inequality
  • ‘Worldmaking’ and the transformation of places and cultures
  • Empowerment, developing sustainable communities and creative / social entrepreneurship
  • Postcolonial readings of tourism
  • Tourism and its relation to gender, class, race, sexuality, ethnicity and disability

Critical tourism research practices

  • Innovative and critical research methods
  • Positionality and the emotional dynamics of research
  • Academic freedom

Critical scholarship in action

  • The relationship between academia and activism
  • Impacts of and empowerment through critical research
  • Public evaluation and dissemination of critical research

All abstracts should be written in English and must not exceed 300 words in length. Abstracts should be sent to cts@surrey.ac.uk and must include: author(s), affiliation(s), a summary of the research aims, approach and key arguments/findings.

Key dates

Abstracts: 31st January 2013. Authors will be notified of acceptance before 15th February 2013.

Full papers (5000 words) and working papers (2000 words) for online, refereed, free-access conference proceedings: April 1st 2013. Full and working papers should be submitted electronically to cts@surrey.ac.uk. Style for papers: Arial 11, double spaced, reference in Harvard style.

Contact the conference conveners:

Dr Lynn Minnaert – l.minnaert@surrey.ac.uk
Dr Senija Causevic – senija.causevic@soas.ac.uk

Dr Irena Ateljevic – irena.ateljevic@iztzg.hr
Professor Nigel Morgan – nmorgan@cardiffmet.ac.uk
Professor Annette Pritchard – apritchard@cardiffmet.ac.uk

Tourism and Local Economic Development: ITSA presentation

The ITSA conference venue

This is the presentation that I gave at the 4th Biennial International Tourism Studies Association conference in Indonesia last month.  It was broadly based on this paper about Tourism and Local Economic Development in England.  I’m planning to carry out some interviews with LEP representatives, local authorities and tourism businesses this year and to write-up the whole thing as a journal article in early 2013.

Some conferences give you certificates, but this mask is my favourite ever conference gift