Events Management: an introduction

Our new book, ‘Events Management: an introduction’ will be published by Routledge on 22nd February 2012.  You can view more information about it here, and pre-order it from Amazon.

“Contemporary events management is a diverse and challenging field. This major new introductory textbook is the first to fully explore the multi-disciplinary nature of events management and to provide the student with all the practical skills and professional knowledge they need to succeed in the events industry.

The book covers every type of event studied on an events management course, including areas as diverse as sports, music, the arts, corporate events, tourism, and the public and voluntary sectors. It introduces all the key issues facing the contemporary events industry, from health, safety and risk management to sustainability to developing a market-oriented business, with every topic brought to life through vivid case-studies, personal biographies and examples of best practice from the real world of events management.

Written by a team of authors with many years experience working in the events industry, the book introduces the practical skills required in every core functional area of events management, such as marketing, finance, project management, strategy, operations, event design and human resources. A companion website for the book includes a dazzling array of additional teaching and learning features, from self-test questions, audio interviews with key industry figures and additional case-studies to Powerpoint slides and an instructors’ guide. Events Management: An Introduction is the essential course text for any events management program”

 

Liminal Landscapes

Wesley Rykalski and I will be presenting a paper based on our research for the arcades / promenades project at  this conference.   Once the paper is finished we’ll post more details up on our project blog, along with a programme for the event, once it is available.

You can read the abstract for our paper by clicking here.  The final paper is quite a development from this point and incorporates some of the material that we have been posting on here over the last year.

Ethnographic methods in events research

A colleague and I have had a paper accepted for the ‘Global Events Congress IV: Events and Festivals Research: The State of the Art’ event, to be held in Leeds from 14-16 July 2010. 

Our paper looks at how the application of methods from ethnography can contribute to events management research.  Bekah carried out participant observation, photographic and auto-photographic research during the Bonnaroo festival in Tennessee in the US.  You can read our abstract here

New posts on Aracdes / Promenades

There are three new posts up on our ‘Reading the Arcades / Reading the Promenades’ blog. The first is on our use of a yahoo pipe to collect images of the seaside promenade, the second is a set of links to other projects who also use Benjamin’s ‘Aracdes Project’ as inspiration for new work, and the latest post is a series of quotations on the use of photography in sociology.

New post on Arcades / Promenades

Wesley has posted up the latest contribution to our ‘Reading the Arcades, reading the Promenades’ blog, where we are attempting to bring together our readings of Walter Benjamins’ ‘Arcades Project‘ and apply these to the British seaside promenade.

The Arcades Project
The Arcades Project

A taster of Wesley’s piece:

“Benjamin is, very, clear and, far too, concise in his summation of the method of The Arcades Project.  Convolute N, which deals with his historical method and his analysis of that method (moving into the philosophy of method and history), contains a very great deal of material but the following are his key methodological statements on the Project itself.

This work has to develop to the highest degree the art of citing without quotation marks. Its theory is intimately related to that of montage.
[N1,10]

Method of this project: literary montage. I needn’t say anything. Merely show. I shall purloin no valuables, appropriate no ingenious formulations. But the rags, the refuse – these I will not inventory but allow, in the only way possible, to come into their own: by making use of them.
[N1a,8] “

New arcades/promenades post

I’ve just posted about ‘the fantasy of cultural history’ and cultural materialism on the arcades/promenades blog.  Wesley has also posted a photo-essay that takes its cue from Brighton’s promenade.

“…fashion…this semblance of the new is reflected, like one mirror in another, in the semblance of the ever recurrent. The product of this reflection is the phantasmagoria of “cultural history” in which the bourgeoisie enjoys its false consciousness to the full.” (Benjamin 2002: 11)

The arcades/promenades blog is a representation of our attempt to grapple with the meanings and practices of the seaside promenade through the lens of Walter Benjamin’s ‘Arcades Project’

Arcades and Promenades

Along with Wesley Rykalski, I have just embarked on an online project that seeks to examine the role of the seaside promenade in the imagination and practices of late modernity, through a critical encounter with Walter Benjamin‘s ‘The Arcades Project’.   In his final project, Benjamin was attempting to critique the ‘bourgeois experience of nineteenth century history’, partly through exploring the covered arcades of Paris, which he saw as emblematic of the attractions and contradictions of capitalist modernity.  By bringing together the arcades and the promenades we hope to enrich our understanding of both of these spatial responses to the coming together of capital, leisure and public space.

We will be collaboratively reading and responding to Benjamin’s text on the arcades / promenades blog and have posted up some reading for March to get things started.  As time goes on, we will develop a strategy of interspersing reflections on these readings with reflections and documentation on the seaside promenade.  More collaborators are welcome, please get in touch via the blog.

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British seaside towns

UPDATE: Work has been slower on this than I imagined, but I see this post is still getting a high number of hits.  I recommend placing it in your favourites or bookmarks and checking back in a month or so!  22/01/09

As part of my research into the regeneration of seaside towns, I’ve begun to use dipity to produce a timeline of their evolution.  It is at a very early stage and I’ll be working on it over the next few months.  Eventually it could become quite a useful resource.  As a web 2.0 platform, dipity is set up for collaboration and cross-platform links which means you can easily bring in images and video clips, as well provide hyperlinks to other resources.  To see the timeline, click on the image below which will take you to the dipity site.  If you would like to collabaorate by adding things to the timeline or changing anything, just sign up to dipity and let me know – I’ll then be able to add you as an editor.