Packaging liminality: the management and commodification of liminal landscapes in tourism

Wesley Rykalski and I have had the abstract below accepted for the ATLAS 2011 conference in Valmeira, Latvia.  The theme of the conference is ’Landscape and Tourism: a dualistic relationship”.  Our plan for this paper is to take the methodology that we’ve been developing through the ‘Reading the Arcades / Reading the Promenades’ project over the last two years and apply it to other tourist spaces, in order to test its value as a new approach to engaging with the non-spaces (Auge 1995) of much touristic practice.

Greening Bonnaroo

This is the presentation that I gave today at the Global Events Congress IV, in Leeds. It is a case study of the event experience and sustainability, based on the application of micro-ethnographic methods.  The primary research was carried out by my colleague, Rebekah Sitz.  The full paper from this study is published in the conference proceedings.

Ethnographic methods in events research

A colleague and I have had a paper accepted for the ‘Global Events Congress IV: Events and Festivals Research: The State of the Art’ event, to be held in Leeds from 14-16 July 2010. 

Our paper looks at how the application of methods from ethnography can contribute to events management research.  Bekah carried out participant observation, photographic and auto-photographic research during the Bonnaroo festival in Tennessee in the US.  You can read our abstract here

New post on Arcades / Promenades

Wesley has posted up the latest contribution to our ‘Reading the Arcades, reading the Promenades’ blog, where we are attempting to bring together our readings of Walter Benjamins’ ‘Arcades Project‘ and apply these to the British seaside promenade.

The Arcades Project
The Arcades Project

A taster of Wesley’s piece:

“Benjamin is, very, clear and, far too, concise in his summation of the method of The Arcades Project.  Convolute N, which deals with his historical method and his analysis of that method (moving into the philosophy of method and history), contains a very great deal of material but the following are his key methodological statements on the Project itself.

This work has to develop to the highest degree the art of citing without quotation marks. Its theory is intimately related to that of montage.
[N1,10]

Method of this project: literary montage. I needn’t say anything. Merely show. I shall purloin no valuables, appropriate no ingenious formulations. But the rags, the refuse – these I will not inventory but allow, in the only way possible, to come into their own: by making use of them.
[N1a,8] “

Methodspace

I have just found a website called Methodspace which claims to be ” the home of the Research Methods community from across the world”, a browse through is very interesting, if you’re into research methods like me….

The site is published by Sage and so I’m sure it will have a pro-sage text bias lurking in there somewhere, but the content appears to be mainly user-generated, with lots of forums and commentary.  If you are carrying out a research project then you should be able to use this site to get feedback on your research design and discuss research issues with like-minded individuals.

The reports of the conference at the LSE last month on social science research and public policy are up on the site, you can view them by clicking here.

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